Sharr – Heidegger’s Hut

Beginning in the summer of 1922, philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) occupied a small, three-room cabin in the Black Forest Mountains of southern Germany. He called it “die Hütte” (“the hut”). Over the years, Heidegger worked on many of his most famous writings in this cabin, from his early lectures to his last enigmatic texts. He claimed an intellectual and emotional intimacy with the building and its surroundings, and even suggested that the landscape expressed itself through him, almost without agency. In ‘Heidegger’s Hut’, Adam Sharr explores this intense relationship of thought, place, and person.

The publication draws on original research, including interviews with Heidegger’s relatives, as well as on written accounts of the hut by Heidegger and his visitors. The book’s evocative photographs include scenic and architectural views taken by the author and many remarkable images of a septuagenarian Heidegger in the hut taken by the photojournalist Digne Meller-Markovicz. There are many ways to interpret Heidegger’s hut—as the site of heroic confrontation between philosopher and existence; as the petit bourgeois escape of a misguided romantic; as a place overshadowed by fascism; or as an entirely unremarkable little building. Heidegger’s Hut does not argue for any one reading, but guides readers toward their own possible interpretations of the importance of “die Hütte.”

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